Today’s event was interesting to me for several reasons. Let’s start by talking about the announcements.

13” MacBook Pro with Retina Display

The 13” MacBook Pro with Retina Display seems like the perfect computer for everyone. I recently got the 15” MacBook Pro with Retina Display, replacing both my iMac and MacBook Air, and honestly, I wish I had just held off the extra few months.

While I maintain that my 15” Pro is the single best computer I have ever owned, I came from an 11” Air. And while the 15” Pro is extremely portable for a 15” notebook, I think I would prefer the lighter 13” Pro, and the tradeoff of the extra power in the 15” for that added portability would be a reasonable one for me, who takes it into work each day.

iMac and Mac Mini

The Mac Mini seems like a good upgrade to the machine, but the machine it’s self has never interested me. Though I lol’d at Phil Schillers “You were expecting something ‘mini’ at this event” joke.

The iMac on the other hand has always fascinated me. It a world where the vast majority of desktop computers are fugly big boxes sitting next to a monitor, the iMac has always stood out as what a desktop computer should look like.

The new one accentuates the difference between Apple and it’s competitors. It’s a stunningly beautiful looking device. It maintains the design aesthetic of the previous two generations, with the big black bezel around the display, and aluminium “chin”, but it’s a serious evolutionary enhancement. But that’s what Apple does: the iPhone 5 is an evolution of the 4/4S; the Retina MBP is an evolution (design wise) of the 2008 revision of the MacBook line.

I just feel sorry for the people that upgraded to the ones released at WWDC.

4th Generation iPad

This release kind of confuses me.

No. Confused isn’t the right word.

I don’t know. On the one had, I’m quite annoyed that the iPad I bought less than a year ago is now out of date. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t feel compelled to upgrade: my iPad is a wonderful device. And I’ve never thought “Damn, this is slow. I wish it was faster.” It’s performing admirably.

But I’m just one person. I know a couple of people who are really quite piddled-off that their device is now obsolete. And I get it. I mean, Apple is literally not selling it any more. You can get the iPad 2, or the 4th Generation iPad.

I guess that makes mine a limited edition, or something. Maybe it’ll be worth something as a collectors item or something in a couple of decades.

iPad Mini

I honestly thought it was gonna have a Retina option. And I’m a little disappointed that it doesn’t but whatever.

I took over the TV in the Living Room to watch the event and my brother — who recently purchased the Nexus 7 — was watching the event, too. When Schiller started comparing the Mini to the Nexus. I mean “competing Android Tablet”… It was one of those moments that I just loved.

The Mini looks like a great device. I wouldn’t get one for myself: I’d love a larger iPad, not a smaller one; and the lack of Retina Display in this day and age would make me gouge my eyes out with a rust spork.

It’s a beautiful device, and I’ve been salivating over the website for a while now, but I don’t want it. Not for myself, at least. I would, however, get one for my mum. Or my little sister. I think it’s the perfect thing for them.

Before, when someone asked advice for a cheap new computer, I’d say “here’s a selection of laptops, or you could get the iPad if you don’t need x, y or z”.

Now, it’ll be “Get the iPad Mini. Or if you want a bigger screen, get the regular iPad. Or, if you need [specific use-case] here’s some cheap laptops”. And with the recent reviews of Windows 8, I think I may stop recommending cheap laptops period, cause I don’t want to have to deal with that catastrophe: having to explain to my untechnologically-minded friends how to work it.