I was reading through the MacRumors forums the this afternoon regarding a supposed leaked iPhone 6 part, and one particular comment stuck out at me.

Ignoring the rest of their post, this part kinda bugs me.

And that brings me onto the second issue, a total lack of success by Tim C to crack down on security breaches. There is no element of surprise any more. Of course, as per the circular Mac Pro, Apple may be using the next iPhone to distract from other new innovations (such as the iWatch etc) and so allow these leaks to keep the media etc away from sources of leaks about other products. Just a guess.

Let’s forget the fact that this person is disappointed by the lack of “surprise” in Apple’s announcements, whilst reading and commenting on a website devoted to sharing rumours and leaks about upcoming products.

They say that Tim Cook has had a “total lack of success” on cracking down on security breaches — a criticism I don’t think he would have faced, were it not for him publicly stating a wish to “Double Down on Secrecy”.

But the claim that Tim Cook has had a lack of success in stopping breaches in secrecy is provably false. In fact, they mention one great example of his success in that area two sentences later — the Mac Pro. We knew nothing about that before it was announced.

We knew something was coming, because Apple told us something was coming, after it quietly refreshed the Mac Pro back in 2012.

But as for when it was coming; what it would look like; what specs it would have: we had no idea.

Then there was iOS 8. We knew about the Health app as a concept, but the design, and even the name, we didn’t. And we didn’t know anything else about about iOS 8. There wasn’t even rumours about most of the other things they announced. Most expected that iOS 8’s “tentpole” feature would be Health and almost everything else would be subtle, under the hood improvements.

Instead, we got huge changes for developers and lots of new user-features.

I’ll admit that leaks from the supply chain in Asia/China hasn’t improved, but I’d also argue that we still know significantly less about the iPhone 6 than we did about iPhones in a long time.

What do we really know about the iPhone 6? Larger screen, probably 4.7″. Maybe an even larger model at 5.5″. New design, with rounded sides. Maybe a sapphire display, but probably not.

That’s it. We know 4 things about it. And even then, the details are super sketchy. We don’t even know what resolution the purported larger screen(s) are supposed to have.

Compare that to what we knew about, say, the iPhone 5. We knew it would have a 4″ display at 640×1136. We knew the design, and the unibody construction, and a new, smaller dock-connector. We knew the rear camera have an 8MP sensor. We knew the processor architecture, and that it would have 1GB RAM.

Although there have been quite a few leaks of the iPhone 6, they’re all of the same parts — the rear shell (which we’ve not actually seen fully yet), and the display glass. We don’t know anything else about the device, other than what those two things can tell us. Which isn’t a lot.


Tim Cook said he wanted to “double down on secrecy”. He has. With each new event, we know slightly less about what Apple’s going to announce.